The gentlemen`s agreement was a diplomatic agreement between the United States and Japan that was first established in 1907. It was a non-binding agreement that aimed to reduce tensions between the two nations and was made in response to the growing anti-Japanese sentiment in the United States.

The agreement was made between then-President Theodore Roosevelt and Japanese Prime Minister Taro Katsura. It stated that Japan would not allow any more unskilled laborers to immigrate to the United States, and in return, the United States would not impose any immigration restrictions on Japanese immigrants already living in the country.

The gentlemen`s agreement was a significant milestone in the history of Japanese-American relations. It marked the first time the two countries had come to a mutual understanding over immigration issues. However, it was not without controversy.

Critics argued that the agreement was discriminatory and unjust, as it effectively prevented any more Japanese immigrants from coming to the United States. It also failed to address the root causes of the anti-Japanese sentiment in the United States, such as economic competition and racism.

Despite these criticisms, the gentlemen`s agreement remained in place until the 1924 Immigration Act effectively banned all immigration from Japan. The agreement remains a significant part of the history of Japanese-American relations and is often studied as an example of diplomatic agreements aimed at reducing tensions between nations.

In conclusion, the gentlemen`s agreement was a non-binding diplomatic agreement between the United States and Japan that aimed to reduce tensions between the two nations. It stated that Japan would not allow any more unskilled laborers to immigrate to the United States, and in return, the United States would not impose any immigration restrictions on Japanese immigrants already living in the country. Although the agreement was criticized for being discriminatory and unjust, it marked a significant milestone in the history of Japanese-American relations.